TENNIS WORLD BIASED AGAINST SERENA WILLIAMS

SERENA STANDS STRONG IN SPITE OF BIAS IN THE TENNIS WORLD!

I have scanned websites and newspapers across the world regarding reporting on the 2011 US Open.  When it comes to bad behavior headlines; why is Serena the player all are obssessed with?  Let’s explore the definition of ‘Bias’, shall we:

BIAS/ˈbīəs/  – DEFINITION

Verb: Show prejudice for or against (someone or
something) unfairly: “the tests were biased against women”;
“a biased view of the world”.

Noun: Prejudice in favor of or against one thing, person, or group
compared with another, usually in a way considered to be unfair.

I referred to the hindrance rule of the WTA’s Rulebook and it suggests that chair umpire Eva Asderaki possibly made a wrong decision in the US Open final when she handed the point to Samantha Stosur because Serena  shouted “C’MON” before the point was completely finished. Stosur barely got her racket on the powerful record.  In fact she had started walking to the opposite corner of the court so sure was she that Serena had won that point.

I stand as one who firmly believes the umpire owes Serena an apology.  Serena Williams DID NOT shout in order to distract her opponent, her reaction was unintentional.

Williams continues to be attacked by the tennis community and the press.  USTA fined her $2,000 because of her verbal exchange with the umpire.  Members of the press collectively scorn her for committing what they call an aggressive reaction to the disputable call Still those same so called Journalist professionals ignore  the documented HISTORY of Roddick-the-Umpire-Abuser and the King of Tantrums John McEnroe.  Plenty of video around showing them walking menacingly up to umpires while cursing, even hitting balls at the umpire chair.  Are these not examples of aggressive reactions?  Or maybe in the eyes and pens of the majority White press – just boys being boys!  As for Serena it’s condemnation ad nauseum! 

Back to that disputable call Ms. Umpire –  the official rule for such a situations says:

26. HINDRANCE

If a player is hindered in playing the point by a deliberate act of the opponent(s), the player shall win
the point. However, the point shall be replayed if a player is hindered in playing the point by either an unintentional act of the opponent(s), or something outside the player’s own control (not including a permanent fixture).

Don’t know if Serena had a FLASHBACK to 2004, but I sure as Hell did!
This umpire Asderaki, who by the way is good friends with  (Mariana Alves) umpire at the 2004 US OPEN.  Williams hit a backhand well inside the sideline at deuce in the opening game of the third set that was called good by the lineswoman but overruled by umpire Alves.   A blind person could see that winner was in. Officials later apologized to Serena. Don’t know if Serena had a flashback to 2004, but I sure as Hell did!

For the record, the USTA banned umpire Alves from continuing to officiate the rest of the 2004 Open.  But she was NOT banned from tennis, as many have called for in Serena’s 2011 incident.  Adding fuel to this fire, Serena  over the years since 2004 has had to play matches in other tournaments with her Alves as umpire!   No protest from Serena about Alves and no further remarks from
Serena about how unfair she found the umpire’s horrible call in 2004.  Still commentators, message boards,and sports
writers are calling Serena the most heinous of words and a disgrace to tennis.  Have you ever heard of a more biased situation?

And if you don’t know the meaning of BIASED treatment – read the definition above AGAIN and AGAIN!

4 thoughts on “TENNIS WORLD BIASED AGAINST SERENA WILLIAMS

  1. fan of tennis (@Tennis77777777) September 26, 2011 / 10:33 am

    Thanks for the thanks!. Don’t know if you follow Bobby Chin on Twitter, but, just to further
    show the absurdity of this call, Bobby recalled a similar situation in the all Williams Wimby final in 2008.

    Faced with a tougher hindrance judgement, ironically also involving Serena, a competent chair umpire called a let. In that situation Serena rallied a ball she thought wide, shouted out in dismay, the ball dropped in, and the chair umpire “called a let because he considered Serena’s shout to be an ‘inadvertent hindrance.’” Serena gave Venus the point, I’m guessing because Serena felt she was in a losing position and it would be unfair to do a replay.

    You can see the NYT write-up in the middle of this page http://nyti.ms/n4oiHB

    It’s absurd to call intentional hindrance on a misplaced shout in the women’s game (where intentional shout-hitting is overlooked). Chair umpires are judges. Eva needs a refresher course in good judgement.

    I’ve read that today is Serena’s birthday. When she blows out the candles, I wonder if she will wish for competent chair-umpiring!

    Liked by 1 person

    • wmssisrock September 27, 2011 / 12:20 am

      Hey fan of tennis! Just finished a brief Happy Birthday Blog to Serena. Read the NYT piece and thanks for making it available. I will now follow Bobby Chin on Twitter. This I found and you’ve got to take a look and a read – ” Once Upon A Time, Serena And That Same Chair Umpire Laughed Off Her Hindrance And They Replayed The Point”

      I vote for that refresher course in “good judgement” for Ms. “I’m So- Famous -Now Eva. Heard that her facebook page is blowing up with new fans since the Open. Also I don’t understand – are there different rules for WTA vs USTA events vs ITF? If so then it’s absurd! Mind if I add to the Birthday Blog your “I wonder if she will wish for competent chair-umpiring!” Great Piece of writing – I wish I had said that! Enjoyed the email chat.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. TennisFan September 17, 2011 / 9:05 pm

    The USTA rule comment 26.1 further shows that an unintentional act should be treated as a Let vs a lose of point. Please see my analysis at http://bit.ly/nXJOm1

    Liked by 1 person

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